What If We Prayed Christ “Clear Through”?

image

Editor’s Note: Do you pray Christ “clear through?” In this blog post, Steve Hall challenges us to pray the lordship of Jesus over everything we pray.

When I was about ten years old, my grandma told me that whenever I prayed, I should “pray clear through.”
This wasn’t just good advice then—it’s also good advice now. It seems we’re at a point in time when we ought to be praying “clear through.”

You’re probably already praying for many people and situations, but I’m going to suggest that through the end of this year, as many believers as possible unite in prayer for Christ’s lordship—his presence and rule—over every part of our lives, and over all other people, places, and situations the Holy Spirit gives us a burden to pray for.

It seems like almost everywhere I turn, there are needs and/or crises. I imagine you’re experiencing the same—frustration, sin, fear, violence, hopelessness, stress, pain, and disease abound. Mankind’s solutions are inadequate.

While we know that Christ is the only answer and hope, we don’t consistently place every person or situation into his hands. Why not?

For quite a few years, I’ve been studying who Christ is. He’s the Eternal God, Creator, and Sustainer of the Universe. He’s the Alpha and Omega, Radiance of God’s Glory, Savior of the World, Resurrection and the Life, King of kings, Lord of lords, and infinitely more.  As Peter says in Acts 10:36, “…Jesus Christ (he is Lord of all:)

In light of his limitless authority in Matthew 18:20, and many other places in the Bible, it seems like we, and the whole Church of 2016, must pray to the Lord Jesus Christ something like what Moses said to God in Exodus 33:18: “…shew me thy glory.

I believe the Father and the Spirit want the glory of Christ to be resoundingly revealed now to the Church and to the lost and dying on every inch of the earth.
Along these lines, please think with me:

• What will the Spirit do in the life of someone you know who has a dire need (cancer, addiction, marriage crisis, homelessness, loss of a loved one) if you continually prayed for Jesus Christ to be Lord of every part of their life?

• What will the Spirit do in the lives of your unsaved friends, relatives, neighbors, co-workers if you continually prayed for Jesus to be Lord of every part of their lives?

• What will the Spirit do in your community if EVERY place you go in (or drive by or walk by) you begin praying for Jesus Christ to be Lord of every person who is associated with those places?

• What will the Spirit do in your church if every time you are involved with your church or ministry you pray that Jesus will be Lord of every person who is part of your church or ministry, including all the messages, worship times, Bible studies, feeding programs, meetings, etc.?
• What will the Spirit do if every time you hear or see anything about government officials (including the candidates for the U.S. presidency) that you pray for Jesus to be Lord of every part of their lives?

• What will the Spirit do if whenever you read or hear any news report or article (local, national or worldwide) you pray for Jesus to be Lord of every person involved? Just imagine how this could impact thousands or millions or even billions of people through the reigning King as he is sitting at the right hand of the Father!

I think if my grandma were writing this blog post, she might plead with us to “pray clear through” for Jesus Christ to be Lord of every person, place and situation because HE IS THE ONLY HOPE OF THE WORLD!

Advertisements

King James IX

WEEK NINE

image

Luke 10:21

(KJV)  In that hour Jesus rejoiced in spirit, and said, I thank thee, O Father, Lord of heaven and earth, that thou hast hid these things from the wise and prudent, and hast revealed them unto babes: even so, Father; for so it seemed good in thy sight.

(1611 KJV) In that houre Iesus reioyced in spirit, and said, I thanke thee, O father, Lord of heauen and earth, that thou hast hid these things from the wise and prudent, and hast reuealed them vnto babes: euen so father, for so it seemed good in thy sight.

(1539 Great Bible) “”That same houre reioysed Iesus in ghost, and sayd: I thanke the, O father. Lorde of heauen and earth, that thou hast hyd these thinges from the wyse and prudent, and hast opened them vnto babes. Euen so father, for so pleased it the.

(1535 Coverdale) “”At the same houre reioysed Iesus in sprete, and sayde: I prayse the (O father and LORDE of heauen and earth) that thou hast hyd these thinges from the wyse and prudent, and hast opened them vnto babes. Euen so father, for so it pleased the.

(1526 Tyndale) That same tyme reioysed Iesus in ye sprete and sayde: I confesse vnto ye father Lorde of heaven and erth yt thou hast hyd these thynges from the wyse and prudent and hast opened them to the babes. Even so father for soo pleased it the.

Counterfeit Versions

(1881 RV) In that same hour he rejoiced in the Holy Spirit, and said, I thank thee, O Father, Lord of heaven and earth, that thou didst hide these things from the wise and understanding, and didst reveal them unto babes: yea, Father; for so it was well-pleasing in thy sight.

(1901 ASV) In that same hour he rejoiced in the Holy Spirit, and said, I thank thee, O Father, Lord of heaven and earth, that thou didst hide these things from the wise and understanding, and didst reveal them unto babes: yea, Father; for so it was well-pleasing in thy sight.

(AMP) In that very hour He was overjoyed and rejoiced greatly in the Holy Spirit, and He said, “I praise You, O Father, Lord of heaven and earth, that You have hidden these things [relating to salvation] from the wise and intelligent, and have revealed them to infants [the childlike and untaught]. Yes, Father, for this way was [Your gracious will and choice, and was] well-pleasing in Your sight.

(CEB) At that very moment, Jesus overflowed with joy from the Holy Spirit and said, “I praise you, Father, Lord of heaven and earth, because you’ve hidden these things from the wise and intelligent and shown them to babies. Indeed, Father, this brings you happiness.

(CEV) At that same time, Jesus felt the joy that comes from the Holy Spirit, and he said: My Father, Lord of heaven and earth, I am grateful that you hid all this from wise and educated people and showed it to ordinary people. Yes, Father, that is what pleased you.

(Douay-Rheims 1899 American Edition) In that very hour He was overjoyed and rejoiced greatly in the Holy Spirit, and He said, “I praise You, O Father, Lord of heaven and earth, that You have hidden these things [relating to salvation] from the wise and intelligent, and have revealed them to infants [the childlike and untaught]. Yes, Father, for this way was [Your gracious will and choice, and was] well-pleasing in Your sight.

(ERV) Then the Holy Spirit made Jesus feel very happy. Jesus said, “I praise you, Father, Lord of heaven and earth. I am thankful that you have hidden these things from those who are so wise and so smart. But you have shown them to people who are like little children. Yes, Father, you did this because it’s what you really wanted to do.

(ESV) In that same hour he rejoiced in the Holy Spirit and said, “I thank you, Father, Lord of heaven and earth, that you have hidden these things from the wise and understanding and revealed them to little children; yes, Father, for such was your gracious will.

(GNB) At that time Jesus was filled with joy by the Holy Spirit and said, “Father, Lord of heaven and earth! I thank you because you have shown to the unlearned what you have hidden from the wise and learned. Yes, Father, this was how you were pleased to have it happen.

(HCSB) In that same hour He rejoiced in the Holy Spirit and said, “I praise You, Father, Lord of heaven and earth, because You have hidden these things from the wise and the learned and have revealed them to infants. Yes, Father, because this was Your good pleasure.

(ISV) At that moment, the Holy Spirit made Jesus extremely joyful, so Jesus said, “I praise you, Father, Lord of heaven and earth, because you have hidden these things from wise and intelligent people and have revealed them to infants. Yes, Father, because this is what was pleasing to you.

(JB PHILLIPS) At that moment Jesus himself was inspired with joy, and exclaimed, “O Father, Lord of Heaven and earth, I thank you for hiding these things from the clever and the intelligent and for showing them to mere children! Yes, I thank you, Father, that this was your will.”

(LEB) At that same time he rejoiced in the Holy Spirit and said, “I praise you, Father, Lord of heaven and earth, that you have hidden these things from the wise and intelligent and have revealed them to young children. Yes, Father, for this was pleasing before you.

(LB) Then he was filled with the joy of the Holy Spirit and said, “I praise you, O Father, Lord of heaven and earth, for hiding these things from the intellectuals and worldly wise and for revealing them to those who are as trusting as little children. Yes, thank you, Father, for that is the way you wanted it.

THE MESSAGE) At that, Jesus rejoiced, exuberant in the Holy Spirit. “I thank you, Father, Master of heaven and earth, that you hid these things from the know-it-alls and showed them to these innocent newcomers. Yes, Father, it pleased you to do it this way.

(NABRE) At that very moment he rejoiced [in] the holy Spirit and said, “I give you praise, Father, Lord of heaven and earth, for although you have hidden these things from the wise and the learned you have revealed them to the childlike. Yes, Father, such has been your gracious will.

(NASV) At that very time He rejoiced greatly in the Holy Spirit, and said, “I praise You, O Father, Lord of heaven and earth, that You have hidden these things from the wise and intelligent and have revealed them to infants. Yes, Father, for this way was well-pleasing in Your sight.

(NCV) Then Jesus rejoiced in the Holy Spirit and said, “I praise you, Father, Lord of heaven and earth, because you have hidden these things from the people who are wise and smart. But you have shown them to those who are like little children. Yes, Father, this is what you really wanted.

(NET) On that same occasion Jesus rejoiced in the Holy Spirit and said, “I praise you, Father, Lord of heaven and earth, because you have hidden these things from the wise and intelligent, and revealed them to little children. Yes, Father, for this was your gracious will.

(NIRV) At that time Jesus was full of joy through the Holy Spirit. He said, “I praise you, Father. You are Lord of heaven and earth. You have hidden these things from wise and educated people. But you have shown them to little children. Yes, Father. This is what you wanted to do.

(NIV) At that time Jesus, full of joy through the Holy Spirit, said, “I praise you, Father, Lord of heaven and earth, because you have hidden these things from the wise and learned, and revealed them to little children. Yes, Father, for this is what you were pleased to do.

(NKJV) In that hour Jesus rejoiced in the Spirit and said, “I thank You, Father, Lord of heaven and earth, that You have hidden these things from the wise and prudent and revealed them to babes. Even so, Father, for so it seemed good in Your sight.

(NLV) At this time Jesus was full of the joy of the Holy Spirit. He said, “I thank You, Father, Lord of heaven and earth. You have kept these things hidden from the wise and from those who have much learning. You have shown them to little children. Yes, Father, it was what you wanted done.

(NLT) At that same time Jesus was filled with the joy of the Holy Spirit, and he said, “O Father, Lord of heaven and earth, thank you for hiding these things from those who think themselves wise and clever, and for revealing them to the childlike. Yes, Father, it pleased you to do it this way.

(NRSV) At that same hour Jesus rejoiced in the Holy Spirit and said, “I thank you, Father, Lord of heaven and earth, because you have hidden these things from the wise and the intelligent and have revealed them to infants; yes, Father, for such was your gracious will.

(RSV) In that same hour he rejoiced in the Holy Spirit and said, “I thank thee, Father, Lord of heaven and earth, that thou hast hidden these things from the wise and understanding and revealed them to babes; yea, Father, for such was thy gracious will.

(TLV) In that very hour, He was overjoyed in the Ruach ha-Kodesh and said, “I praise You, Father, Master of the universe, that You have hidden these things from the wise and discerning and revealed them to infants. Yes, Father, for this way was pleasing to You.

(VOICE) Then Jesus Himself became elated. The Holy Spirit was on Him, and He began to pray with joy. Jesus: Thank You, Father, Lord of heaven and earth. Thank You for hiding Your mysteries from the wise and intellectual, instead revealing them to little children. Your ways are truly gracious.

(NWT-Jehovah’s Witnesses) In that very hour he became overjoyed in the holy spirit and said: “I publicly praise you, Father, Lord of heaven and earth, because you have carefully hidden these things from wise and intellectual ones and have revealed them to young children. Yes, O Father, because this is the way you approved.

 Textus Receptus – Traditional Text

εν αυτη τη ωρα ηγαλλιασατο τω πνευματι ο ιησους και ειπεν εξομολογουμαι σοι πατερ κυριε του ουρανου και της γης οτι απεκρυψας ταυτα απο σοφων και συνετων και απεκαλυψας αυτα νηπιοις ναι ο πατηρ οτι ουτως εγενετο ευδοκια εμπροσθεν σου

 

Hort-Westcott – Critical Text

εν αυτη τη ωρα ηγαλλιασατο τω πνευματι τω αγιω και ειπεν εξομολογουμαι σοι πατερ κυριε του ουρανου και της γης οτι απεκρυψας ταυτα απο σοφων και συνετων και απεκαλυψας αυτα νηπιοις ναι ο πατηρ οτι ουτως ευδοκια εγενετο εμπροσθεν σου

 

Corrupted Manuscripts

This verse is corrupted in the following manuscripts:

 

Changes “Jesus” to “he”

Aleph 01 – Sinaiticus – Nineteenth Century Counterfeit
B 03 – Vaticanus – Fourth century

D 05 – Bezae Cantabrigiensis – Fifth century

P 45 – Third Century

P 75 – Third Century

 

Adds “the Holy” before “spirit”

Aleph 01 – Sinaiticus – Nineteenth Century Counterfeit
B 03 – Vaticanus – Fourth century

C 04 – Ephraemi Rescriptus – Fifth century

D 05 – Bezae Cantabrigiensis – Fifth century

K 017 – Ninth century

L 019 – Seventh century

Theta 038 – Ninth century

XI 040 – Sixth century

P 75 – Third Century

Manuscripts which agree with the Textus Receptus for this Verse

 

Does not contain “the Holy” before “spirit”

Byzantine Text (450-1450 A.D.)

A 02 – Alexandrinus – Fifth century

C 04 – Ephraemi Rescriptus – Fifth century

K 017 – Ninth century

W 032 – Fourth/fifth century

Gamma 036 – Ninth or Tenth century

Delta 037 – Ninth century

Theta 038 – Ninth century

1 (Minuscule) – Seventh century

13 (Minuscule) – Eighth century

Published Critical Greek Texts with Corruptions

Changes “Jesus” to “he”

Lachmann, Karl – 1842

Tischendorf, Constantine – 1869

Tregelles, Samuel – 1857

Alford, Henry – 1849 revised in 1871

Westcott and Hort – 1881

Weiss, Bernhard – 1894

Nestle – 1927 as revised in seventeenth edition in 1941

Nestle-Aland – 1979 – Twenty Sixth Edition

Nestle-Aland – 1993 – Twenty Seventh Edition

Nestle-Aland – 2012 – Twenty Eighth Edition

United Bible Societies – 1983 – Fourth Edition

Von Soden, Freiherr – 1902

 

Adds “the Holy” before “spirit”

Lachmann, Karl – 1842

Tischendorf, Constantine – 1869

Tregelles, Samuel – 1857

Alford, Henry – 1849 revised in 1871

Westcott and Hort – 1881

Weiss, Bernhard – 1894

Nestle – 1927 as revised in seventeenth edition in 1941

Nestle-Aland – 1979 – Twenty Sixth Edition

Nestle-Aland – 1993 – Twenty Seventh Edition

Nestle-Aland – 2012 – Twenty Eighth Edition

United Bible Societies – 1983 – Fourth Edition

Von Soden, Freiherr – 1902

Affected Teaching

The Holy Spirit is not in view in this verse.  This is why the King James translators did not capitalize “spirit” as they did in every other place when referencing the holy Spirit. Ephesians 4:30 (KJV) And grieve not the holy Spirit of God, whereby ye are sealed unto the day of redemption.
Jesus rejoiced in his spirit when the 70 came back reporting a successful missionary venture.  Now it is true that the Holy Spirit gives the true believer joy but in this verse the spirit of Jesus was in view. It would be like going to a Bible conference and coming away refreshed in the “spirit.”  It does not mean the Holy Spirit is refreshed because He is the one who does the refreshing.  In other words, their successful missionary venture gave Jesus much joy.  The modern versions also changed “Jesus” to “he” thus reducing Him to a nameless character. 

Ye Shall Receive Power, #14

image

And said unto me, What seest thou? And I said, I have looked, and behold a candlestick all of gold, with a bowl upon the top of it, and his seven lamps thereon, and seven pipes to the seven lamps, which are upon the top thereof:” (Zechariah 4:2)

These are the two olive trees, and the two candlesticks standing before the God of the earth. (Revelation 11:4)
Zechariah speaks of one lampstand and two olive trees. But Revelation 11:4 mentions two lampstands and two olive trees. Why?
The explanation may be thus: at the time of Zechariah, the Body of Christ, which is the second lampstand, had not been formed. There was only the one Lampstand—the Lord Jesus Christ. Christ means “the One anointed with oil.
Now we have the exalted Head, Christ, but also the Body of Christ, the Body of the One anointed with oil. There now are two lampstands, although the two are one, as we shall discuss later.
Who or what are the two olive trees? The two olive trees are the source of continual oil for the Lampstand (unlike the Lampstand of the Tabernacle of the Congregation which had to be refilled every twenty-four hours).
Then said he, These are the two anointed ones, that stand by the Lord of the whole earth.” (Zechariah 4:14)
Elijah and Elisha appear to be the strongest representatives of the “two anointed ones.” Each of them employed the expression “as the Lord liveth before whom I stand.” No other person in the Bible used that expression.
We could not see Elijah when John the Baptist appeared, yet the spirit of Elijah rested on John. We will not see Elisha, the prophet of the double portion, when Christ and His Body minister. But the double portion will rest on them. More about these two later.
The number two represents a lawful witness. Under Old Testament law, two or more witnesses are required if the testimony is to be established in court.
Also, “two” symbolizes power. The Spirit’s anointing of the prophets of all ages provides the power for their testimony of the Person and Word of God.
Two large loaves made from wheat flour were waved during the celebration of the feast of Pentecost. These two loaves mark the completion of the wheat harvest, indicating that the greatest Pentecost of all will come at the end of the age.
Ye shall bring out of your habitations two wave loaves [the two witnesses] of two tenth deals; they shall be of fine flour; they shall be baken with leaven; they are the firstfruits unto the Lord.” (Leviticus 23:17)
The two olive trees are the double portion of Pentecost, the power to bear witness of the God of the earth. They are the “greater works,” the powerful Pentecostal revival of the last days, the latter (harvest) rain.
The same Pentecostal power that rested on Joel abode on Peter. Therefore Peter cried, “This is that which was spoken by the prophet Joel.
This same Pentecostal power, now in unlimited fullness, will rest on the end-time remnant enabling them to bear witness to the whole earth of the soon coming of the Lord Jesus Christ. This is the meaning of the two olive trees. One olive tree for the former rain. Two olive trees for the latter rain (Joel 2:23).

To be continued #15…

Ye Shall Receive Power, #13

image

And the angel that talked with me came again, and waked me, as a man that is wakened out of his sleep. And said unto me, What seest thou? And I said, I have looked, And behold a candlestick [lampstand] all of gold, with a bowl upon the top of it, and his seven lamps thereon, and seven pipes to the seven lamps, which are upon the top thereof: And two olive trees by it, one upon the right side of the bowl, and the other upon the left side thereof. So I answered and spake to the angel that talked with me, saying, What are these, my lord? Then the angel that talked with me answered and said unto me, Knowest thou not what these be? And I said, No, my lord. Then he answered and spake unto me, saying, This is the word of the Lord unto Zerubbabel, saying, Not by might, nor by power, but by my spirit, saith the Lord of hosts.” (Zechariah 4:1-6)
The two olive trees, and one of the lampstands of Revelation 11:4, are described in the fourth chapter of the Book of Zechariah.
Revelation 11:4, in conjunction with the preceding passage from Zechariah, signifies that just before Jesus returns, the true saints will be forced to abandon human efforts to save the world. We shall allow the Holy Spirit to use us as He will. He indeed shall use us. The Spirit is waiting for us to discover only He can perform the work of the Kingdom of God.
The significance of the olive trees and the lampstands (“candlesticksKJV) is that only the Spirit of God is able to build the Temple of God.
Notice (in Zechariah, Chapter Four) that there are two olive trees but only one lampstand.
The prophecies of Zechariah had directly to do with the return of the Jews from Babylon to Jerusalem to rebuild that which had been torn down by Nebuchadnezzar, particularly the Temple of Solomon. The efforts to restore Jerusalem are described in the Books of Ezra and Nehemiah.
In addition to its application to the restoration of physical Jerusalem in the days of Ezra and Nehemiah, the Book of Zechariah is strongly symbolic concerning Christ and His Kingdom.
We believe verses six through nine of Chapter Four of Zechariah have to do with the coming of the Lord and the completion of the Temple of God; with the accomplishment of the mystery of God, which is Christ in us:
Then he answered and spake unto me, saying, This is the word of the Lord unto Zerubbabel, saying, Not by might, nor by power, but by my spirit, saith the Lord of hosts. Who art thou, O great mountain? before Zerubbabel thou shalt become a plain: and he shall bring forth the headstone [Christ] thereof with shoutings, crying, Grace, grace unto it. Moreover the word of the Lord came unto me, saying, The hands of Zerubbabel have laid the foundation [Christ—the Foundation of the Temple of God] of this house; his hands shall also finish it [complete the mystery of God, which is Christ in us, the hope of glory]; and thou shalt know the Lord of hosts hath sent me unto you.” (Zechariah 4:6-9)
Compare:
But in the days of the voice of the seventh angel, when he shall begin to sound, the mystery of God should be finished, as he hath declared to his servants the prophets.” (Revelation 10:7)

To be continued #14…

Ye Shall Receive Power, #12

image

Wherein in time past ye walked according to the course of this world, according to the prince of the power of the air, the spirit that now worketh in the children of disobedience:” (Ephesians 2:2)
satan has convinced the churches that he is the God of the earth; but he is not. He is the God of the spirit of this age, of the world system. He is the spirit that directs the children of disobedience.
Our God is the God of the whole earth, praise His holy Name! He has given all the earth and its peoples to Christ and to whomever Christ desires to share them with.
God is preparing a Deliverer who will destroy the evil angels. The Deliverer is Christ—Head and Body.
Before the God of the earth utilizes Christ to deliver the earth from corruption, He will use His Christ (the Head working with and in the Body) as a final witness who will testify with powerful signs and wonders to all the peoples of the earth of the coming rule of God over the nations.
The two olive trees represent the double portion of the anointing of the Spirit of God, the Spirit of the prophets of all time, of every age. Of particular significance here is the Spirit who abode on Elijah and Elisha. The lives and ministries of Elijah and Elisha are symbolic of the two witnesses of Revelation, Chapter 11. Christ gave the former rain “moderately” under the old covenant (Joel 2:23). The rain increased in power at the time of the Book of Acts. But just before Jesus returns, the full flowing of “oil” will cause the Lampstands to burn with great brightness giving an earth-wide witness of the resurrection of Christ. There will be a continual, unlimited anointing on Christ’s witnesses in the last days.
The two lampstands represent Christ and His Body, as we understand the symbolism. Only Christ and His Body are the Lampstands of God. They are the only “lights” of the world. No prophet ever was referred to as “the light of the world.
Indeed, the prophets were lights shining in dark places as the Spirit of Christ spoke through them. But no saint of the Old Testament ever was termed “the light of the world.” However, the Scriptures refer to Jesus as “the light of the world” and to the saints as “the light of the world.” Only the Lord Jesus Christ is the Lampstand of God, the Light of the world; and His Body is being built up in Him and fashioned in His image.
John was not “that light,” but was sent to bear witness of “that light.” “That light” is in us, in the members of the Body of Christ.

To be continued #13

Rescue Your Prayer Life

image

What does the doctrine of the Trinity have to do with the practice of prayer? Well, the Trinity is something that all Christians believe, but often find difficult to understand, much less explain. And prayer is something that all Christians do, but rarely practice with the consistency and delight they know they should. In the realms of Christian doctrine, the Trinity ranks among the most difficult. Among the disciplines of Christian living, prayer tops the list as most challenging.
But there’s another connection between prayer and Trinitarian theology that helps us better understand the doctrine of the Trinity and make progress in our prayer lives. The connection is in many passages, but most succinctly in Ephesians 2:18 where Paul says, “For through him we both have access by one Spirit unto the Father.
This sentence is pregnant with significance for understanding who God is and how we can come to Him.

But first, some definitions: What do Christians mean when they talk about the Trinity? Essentially, three things. You might think of these as three strong pillars on which the doctrine of the Trinity rests.
First, we mean that there is only one God. “Hear, O Israel: The LORD our God is one LORD:” (Deuteronomy 6:4).
Second, this one God exists in three distinct persons, or personalities: the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit.
Third, the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit are each fully, equally, and eternally God.
Deny one of those statements, and we get into trouble. If we deny the first and say that there are actually three gods, then we are tri-theists, rather than monotheists. More commonly, people say that there is one God who acts in three different modes, or manifests himself in three different ways, or wears three different hats: the Father, the Son, and the Spirit (much as I myself am a son, a husband, and a father).  But this idea (formally known as modalism), denies the second pillar, and dozens of texts, that affirm the distinct personalities of Father, Son, and Spirit. Others, especially among the cults, teach that the Son and/or the Spirit are somehow inferior to the Father, being less than fully, equally, and eternally God.
But Scripture leads us to affirm all three pillars. There is one God, who exists in three Persons, the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit, and these three are each fully, equally, and eternally God.

So, what does this have to do with prayer? Well, prayer is essentially talking with God. But communication with God requires access to his presence. Ephesians 2:18 shows us that our access to God involves all three Persons of the Trinity. 
We have “access…to the Father.” 
But that access to the Father is “through him” – Jesus Christ, God’s Son, who reconciles us to the Father (see Ephesians 2:11).
But notice further that our access to God is “in one spirit“. This means that our prayers are enabled and empowered by the Spirit.
So, when we pray we come to Father, through the Son, in the Spirit. Prayer is communion with the Three-in-One God.
Now, how can this rescue your prayer life?
Sometimes we hesitate to pray, because of unbelief. We’re not sure God really cares about our needs. But this is to forget that we’re praying to our Father, who already knows our needs and invites us to come to him as little children.
At other times, we wrongly think we’ve got to manufacture certain feelings or emotions in order to pray. But Paul says that we have access to God in the Spirit. The Spirit is the One who enlivens our hearts and enables us to pray.

All too often, we feel compelled to pray from a sense of duty. (Good Christians pray, therefore, if I want to be a good Christian, I should pray.) Or, we’re held back from prayer by a sense of guilt. (Only good Christians can really come to God. I haven’t been very good lately, so I’m not worthy enough for God to hear my prayers.) Worst of all, sometimes we can feel confident about prayer because we’ve been keeping our Christian noses clean!
But, don’t you see? This is self-reliance and legalism. This kind of thinking and praying, neglects the work of the Son in reconciling us to the Father. When we live and pray like this, we’re not coming through Jesus. We’re coming on the basis of our own merits. And there is no access to God that way. But when we remember that our access to God is through Christ alone, then we can come boldly to the throne of grace in the confidence that God will forgive our sins and hear our prayers, for Jesus’ sake.

Exposed: Secret Government Plot to Seize Your Cash

Weiss Research Inc. 

Hey Activists, (*my American friends

We urge you to drop everything you’re doing, right now, and read a shocking new report that has just been posted online.

We don’t know how much longer it will be available.

In fact, the information in this bulletin could soon be classified “Top Secret” by the U.S. government — and perhaps even banned for dissemination under the pretext of “national security.”

That’s because this report reveals what could turn out to be the greatest financial conspiracy in the history of the United States — a conspiracy so vast it will determine the future of every American for the next 50 years.

Click here to read The Secret Government Plot to Control All Your Money free while it’s still online …

(*input mine)

What Jesus Really Said about Poverty

image

In Jesus, God came as a poor man, lived as a poor man, and died as a poor man. He is good news to the poor. As such, Jesus cared deeply about the impoverished.

Being What We Believe
What we do with our beliefs is as important to Jesus as what we believe. Jesus is about complete commitment to loving him and others. Jesus loves belief-filled actions, as his saying to a wealthy young man shows:
Jesus said unto him, If thou wilt be perfect, go and sell that thou hast, and give to the poor, and thou shalt have treasure in heaven: and come and follow me.” (Matthew 19:21; see 19:16–30). The man walks away sorrowful. Jesus then says his famous:
….Verily I say unto you, That a rich man shall hardly enter into the kingdom of heaven.
And again I say unto you, It is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle, than for a rich man to enter into the kingdom of God.” (Matthew 19:23–24).
image

Jesus’ disciples then ask, “….they were exceedingly amazed, saying, Who then can be saved?
But Jesus beheld them, and said unto them, With men this is impossible; but with God all things are possible.” (Matthew 19:25–26). Jesus is not suggesting it is impossible for a rich person to enter the kingdom of heaven, or be saved—He is saying it is only possible with God. For God to enter a person’s life they must be open to Him entering.
Many of us are just like the rich young man. Out of one side of our mouth we speak allegiance to Jesus, but out of the other side we’re speaking allegiance to the trappings of wealth. I know, because the rich young man asks the same questions I would ask. Look at the events that prompted Jesus to make his statement about the wealthy:
“And, behold, one came and said unto him, Good Master, what good thing shall I do, that I may have eternal life?
And he said unto him, Why callest thou me good? there is none good but one, that is, God: but if thou wilt enter into life, keep the commandments.
He saith unto him, Which? Jesus said, Thou shalt do no murder, Thou shalt not commit adultery, Thou shalt not steal, Thou shalt not bear false witness,
Honour thy father and thy mother: and, Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself.
The young man saith unto him, All these things have I kept from my youth up: what lack I yet?” (Matthew 19:16–21).

Jesus is possibly frustrated and perhaps even offended: “Why are you asking me about who is good?” The man is asking the wrong question. He doesn’t ask how he can follow Jesus, or what it means to be a disciple—or what good thing he can do for the world on behalf of a good God. He asks, “What must I do so that I will have eternal life?” If we’re honest with ourselves, isn’t that the question many of us are asking God today? Jesus is unsatisfied with that question.
Eternal life (salvation) is God’s great gift, but it’s meant to be a gift that prompts action. It is meant to give us purpose.
When I was confronted with the reality of the story of the rich young man, I again asked another question that he asks: “Which commandments?” Jesus cites to the man all the relational Ten Commandments, and in doing so, basically implies, “All of them.” The man tells Jesus he has observed these and then asks, “What do I lack?” It is this question that gets to the root of the issue. Jesus tells the man that he lacks self-sacrifice for others—he lacks giving to the extent that it is painful to him. He lacks an ability to put aside his wealth for the sake of the gospel. Wealth is meant to bless others—plain and simple (see Genesis 12:1–3 for an example). It is not for hording, and it will—if not given up, when God prompts you—keep you from fully experiencing the blessings of God.

What Jesus Really Said about Poverty

by John Barry

image

In Jesus, God came as a poor man, lived as a poor man, and died as a poor man. He is good news to the poor. As such, Jesus cared deeply about the impoverished.

Being What We Believe
What we do with our beliefs is as important to Jesus as what we believe. Jesus is about complete commitment to loving him and others. Jesus loves belief-filled actions, as his saying to a wealthy young man shows:
Jesus said unto him, If thou wilt be perfect, go and sell that thou hast, and give to the poor, and thou shalt have treasure in heaven: and come and follow me.” (Matthew 19:21; see 19:16–30). The man walks away sorrowful. Jesus then says his famous:
….Verily I say unto you, That a rich man shall hardly enter into the kingdom of heaven.
And again I say unto you, It is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle, than for a rich man to enter into the kingdom of God.” (Matthew 19:23–24).

Jesus’ disciples then ask, “….they were exceedingly amazed, saying, Who then can be saved?
But Jesus beheld them, and said unto them, With men this is impossible; but with God all things are possible.” (Matthew 19:25–26). Jesus is not suggesting it is impossible for a rich person to enter the kingdom of heaven, or be saved—He is saying it is only possible with God. For God to enter a person’s life they must be open to Him entering.
Many of us are just like the rich young man. Out of one side of our mouth we speak allegiance to Jesus, but out of the other side we’re speaking allegiance to the trappings of wealth. I know, because the rich young man asks the same questions I would ask. Look at the events that prompted Jesus to make his statement about the wealthy:
“And, behold, one came and said unto him, Good Master, what good thing shall I do, that I may have eternal life?
And he said unto him, Why callest thou me good? there is none good but one, that is, God: but if thou wilt enter into life, keep the commandments.
He saith unto him, Which? Jesus said, Thou shalt do no murder, Thou shalt not commit adultery, Thou shalt not steal, Thou shalt not bear false witness,
Honour thy father and thy mother: and, Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself.
The young man saith unto him, All these things have I kept from my youth up: what lack I yet?” (Matthew 19:16–21).

Jesus is possibly frustrated and perhaps even offended: “Why are you asking me about who is good?” The man is asking the wrong question. He doesn’t ask how he can follow Jesus, or what it means to be a disciple—or what good thing he can do for the world on behalf of a good God. He asks, “What must I do so that I will have eternal life?” If we’re honest with ourselves, isn’t that the question many of us are asking God today? Jesus is unsatisfied with that question.
Eternal life (salvation) is God’s great gift, but it’s meant to be a gift that prompts action. It is meant to give us purpose.
When I was confronted with the reality of the story of the rich young man, I again asked another question that he asks: “Which commandments?” Jesus cites to the man all the relational Ten Commandments, and in doing so, basically implies, “All of them.” The man tells Jesus he has observed these and then asks, “What do I lack?” It is this question that gets to the root of the issue. Jesus tells the man that he lacks self-sacrifice for others—he lacks giving to the extent that it is painful to him. He lacks an ability to put aside his wealth for the sake of the gospel. Wealth is meant to bless others—plain and simple (see Genesis 12:1–3 for an example). It is not for hording, and it will—if not given up, when God prompts you—keep you from fully experiencing the blessings of God.